NEW MAPPINGS OF EUROPE | Ibro Hasanović: A Workshop with Migrants
05 October 2018 | 17:00
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Artist in residency, Ibro Hasanović has been working with a group of migrants from Syria, Iran, Afganistan and Eritrea, who live in Slovenia for more than a year. They approached the method of "storytelling" through different activities (story writing, video-making, clay moulding) in order to materialize their experiences and memories in a creative way.

 

In the conclusion of the workshop, the results were presented on an exhibition openned for public on 5 October 2018 at 5 p.m. at the Museum of Contemporary Art Metelkova, Ljubljana, Slovenia.

 

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Ibro Hasanović was born 1981 in Ljubovija, then Yugoslavia. Studied product design at the Academy of Fine Arts in Sarajevo and contemporary art and cinema at Le Fresnoy – Studio National des Arts Contemporains in France. His works have been recently exhibited at the Austrian Cultural Forum New York, Munchner Stadtmuseum, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art (Moscow), Museum of Fine Arts (Split), Kunsthalle Wien, 55th October Salon (Belgrade), National Gallery of Kosovo, Museum of Contemporary Art (Zagreb), Künstlerhaus - Halle für Kunst & Medien (Graz), 2nd Project Biennial D-0 ARK Underground and Villa Romana (Florence). He currently lives in Brussels.

http://www.ibrohasanovic.com/

 

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The workshop is a part of European project New Mappings of Europe, in partnership of Moderna galerija, Ljubljana, Museum of Yugoslav History, Belgrade, Akademie der bildenden Künste, Vienna, Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art (mima).

 

The questions that the project New Mappings of Europe departs from are: What are the common experiences that might link these seemingly different migrants? And how did mass arrivals of people from various parts of the world change not only the way we perceive Europe but also the way Europe is perceived from the outside? With a focused attention to the forms of progressive imagination, we would like to offer some answers to those questions. The questions are especially relevant in our contemporary situation when new migrants, asylum seekers and refugees are arriving from all parts of the world due to social, political and economic reasons as well as climate changes. Europe has always been faced with the challenge of including migrants in society. These processes are usually long and complex. An important dimension of inclusion is through culture and through attaching positive social values to migrants' cultural heritage.

 

 
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